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New Book Coauthored by Raul Rabadan, PhD
Dr. Raul Rabadan coauthors new book that introduces techniques of topological data analysis, a rapidly growing subfield of mathematics. (Cambridge University Press)

The deluge of data in the diverse field of biology comes with it the challenge of extracting meaningful information from large biological data sets. A new book, Topological Data Analysis for Genomics and Evolution, introduces central ideas and techniques of topological data analysis and aims to explain in detail a number of specific applications to biology.

“High-throughput genomics has profoundly transformed the field of modern biology and has made it possible for scientists to make rapid scientific advances,” says the book’s co-author Dr. Raul Rabadan, professor of systems biology and founding director of Columbia University’s Program for Mathematical Genomics. “The explosion of data has hit biology, and as a result, we need new, more innovative analytical and computational tools to make sense of it all.”

Co-authored with Andrew J. Blumberg, PhD, professor of mathematics at University of Texas at Austin, the new book discusses techniques of topological data analysis, a rapidly developing subfield of mathematics that provides a methodology for analyzing the shape of data sets. The book offers several examples of these techniques and their use in multiple areas of biology, including the evolution of viruses, bacteria and humans, genomics of cancer, and single cell characterization of developmental processes.

Columbia investigators win Chan Zuckerberg Initiative grants to accelerate development of cellular roadmap of the human body.

In two groundbreaking research projects contributing to the Human Cell Atlas, Columbia University scientists are tasked with mapping complete cells in the immune system and the human spine. The global effort is aiming to identify and define every cell type of the human body and create a collection of maps for navigating the cellular basis of human health and disease.

Peter Sims, PhD
Peter Sims, PhD, assistant professor of systems biology

The Columbia teams, which include co-principal investigators from the Department of Systems Biology Drs. Peter Sims and Raul Rabadan , are among the 38 collaborative science teams launching the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative’s (CZI) Seed Networks for the Human Cell Atlas project announced today. The three-year projects, receiving a total of $68 million in award funding by Seed Networks, are collaborative groups that are bringing together expertise in science, computational biology, software engineering, and medicine to support the ongoing progress of the Human Cell Atlas .

Investigating the Immune System + Aging

Dr. Sims, part of an international team including close collaborator Dr. Donna Farber of the Department of Surgery , is combining single-cell sequencing technologies, data analysis, and immunology expertise to better understand how the immune system ages and gain new insights into how human diseases occur. 

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